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Celebrating Rosh Hashanah 2012 in Newton

Where to celebrate and what to eat this holiday season.

This Sunday, Sept. 16, as the day draws to a close, Newton's Jewish community will ring in year 5773 as part of their celebration of Rosh Hashanah, or the Jewish New Year. The festivities will continue until nightfall on Tuesday, Sept. 18.

In Newton, services are scheduled at several local temples, including:

, 561 Ward St., Newton Centre

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Candle lighting at 6:35 p.m.
  • Mincha and Maariv at 6:40 p.m.

 Rosh Hashanah - Monday & Tuesday, Sept. 17 & 18:

  • Shacharit at 8 a.m.
  • Torah reading at 9:45 a.m.
  • Shofar at 10:30 a.m.
  • Tashlich (Only Monday afternoon): Mincha and Maariv at 6:40 p.m.; and candle lighting after 7:33 p.m.

 

, 45 Puddingstone Ln., Newton Centre

Request High Holiday tickets for non-members online.

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Service at 7:30 p.m. followed by Oneg in the Sanctuary

Rosh Hashanah Day One - Monday, Sept. 17:

  • Early service at 8:30 a.m. in the Sanctuary
  • Youth service at 9:30 a.m. in the Temple
  • Youth service for Grades 3 to 5 at noon
  • Late service at noon in the Sanctuary
  • Family service at 3 p.m. in the Sanctuary
  • Tashlich at 4:30 p.m. at Newton City Hall, 1000 Commonwealth Ave., Newton Centre

Rosh Hashanah Day Two - Tuesday, Sept. 18:

  • Service at 10 a.m. followed by Congregational Kiddush

 

, 385 Ward St., Newton

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Mincha/Arvit in the Rabbi Samuel Chiel Sanctuary from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Mincha and Arvit in Reisman Hall from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Day One - Monday, Sept. 17:

  • Early Services: Gann Chapel and Rabbi Samuel Chiel Sanctuary from 8 to 11:15 a.m.; Traditional Service in Reisman Hall 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Children’s Services (ages 6 to 13) from 9:30 to 11:15 a.m.; Tot Services (ages 3 to 5) from 10 to 10:45 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
  • Late Services: Rabbi Samuel Chiel Sanctuary and Adelson Community Hall from 11:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; Teen Services (ages 12 to 17) from 11:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; Children’s Services (ages 6 to 13) from 11:45 to 2:30 p.m.; Tot Services (ages 3 to 5) from 12:45 to 1:30 p.m.; Mincha and Arvit in the Rabbi Samuel Chiel Sanctuary from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
  • Tashlich at Bullough’s Pond: Walk from the Temple to Bullough's Pond at 4:30 p.m., or meet there at 5 p.m.  As part of the ceremony, every child will be given a Shofar.

Rosh Hashanah Day Two - Tuesday, Sept. 18:

  • Early Services: Rabbi Samuel Chiel Sanctuary from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m.; Contemporary Service in Adelson Community Hall from 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.; Reisman Hall from 8:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Children’s Services (ages 6 to 13) from 9 to 10:30 a.m.; Tot Services (ages 3 to 5) from 9:45 to 10:30 a.m.
  • Late Services: Contemporary Service in Adelson Community Hall from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Family service from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.; Tot Services (ages 3 to 5) from 12:45 to 1:30 p.m.; Mincha/Ma'ariv in Gann Chapel from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.

 

CONGREGATION DORSHEI TZEDEK, Services will be held at the Gann Academy, 333 Forest St. in Waltham

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Service at 8 p.m., Gann Academy

Rosh Hashanah, Day 1 - Monday, Sept. 17:

  • Service at 9:30 a.m.
  • Taschlich at 4:30 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah, Day 2 - Tuesday, Sept. 18:

  • Service at 10 a.m.

 

, 1860 Washington St., Auburndale

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Candle lighting at 6:34 p.m. followed by Mincha and Maariv at 6:45 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Day One & Two - Monday & Tuesday Sept. 17 & 18:

  • Shacharit at 8:30 a.m.
  • Torah service followed by Shofar and Mussaf at 9:15 a.m.
  • Tot chag, Mini minyan, Junior Congregation and Teen Services - 10:30am
  • Tashlich (Day 1 only) - 5:15pm
  • Mincha/Maariv - 6:45pm

 

175 Temple St., West Newton

Rosh Hashanah Family Service - Monday, Sept. 17:

For members who are unable to be present at Services, we offer an option for you to listen via telephone. Call 1-800-846-4808 at the time of services and when prompted, enter 99955000 on your phone and you will be connected. 

 

, 168 Adams St., Newton

Erev Rash Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Micnha and Maariv at 6:30 p.m. (Light candles at 6:33 p.m.)

Rosh Hashanah Day One - Monday, Sept. 17:

  • Shacharit at 8 a.m.
  • Torah reading at 10 a.m.
  • Sermon and Shofar at 10:30 a.m.
  • Musaf at 11 a.m.
  • Tashlich at 5:30 p.m.
  • Mincha and Maariv 6:15 p.m. (Light candles at 7:32 p.m.)

Rosh Hashanah Day Two - Tuesday, Sept. 18: 

  • Shacharit at 8 a.m.
  • Torah reading at 10 a.m.
  • Sermon and Shofar at 10:30 a.m.
  • Musaf at 11 a.m.
  • Mincha at 6:45 p.m.

 

, 300 Hammond Pond Parkway, Chestnut Hill

Erev Rosh Hashanah - Sunday, Sept. 16:

  • Mincha and Maariv at 6:15 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah, Day One - Monday, Sept. 17:

  • Shacharit at 8 a.m.
  • Torah reading at 9:15 a.m.
  • Shofar service at 10 a.m.
  • Musaf service at 10:30 a.m.
  • Sermon at 11 a.m.

 

Did we miss any services? Please let us know by adding them in the comments section below!

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Rosh Hashanah, which literally means “head of the year,” signals the beginning of the High Holy Days. Yom Kippur, or Day of Atonement, marks the end, and together they are two of the holiest days for Jews.

Like most New Year celebrations, Rosh Hashanah is a time of introspection and a time to bring about changes in the coming year. The traditional blowing of the shofar, or ram’s horn, during services on Rosh Hashanah marks a time to contemplate past mistakes and find ways to make things right.

On this day, as on Sabbath, Jews avoid work and spend the day with family. And where there’s a family gathering, can food be far behind? It’s no surprise that after services Jewish families tuck into an elaborate spread of traditional dishes.

The day begins with eating apples dipped in honey, in hopes that the new year will also be sweet. Another tradition is to bake challah, a round-shaped bread that is a symbol of the circle of life.

So, it's time to get into that festive mood! Patch has come up with some great recipes that will make your Rosh Hoshanah meal extra special this year.

Newton Patch contributor shared her family recipe for a mouth-watering, traditional meal complete with , and .

This year, Schapiro shared .

Want to try something new this year? Take a look at this , which Susan Silverberg shared on Culver City Patch.

In the mood for some baking and indulging that sweet tooth at the same time? Try this recipe for from West Bloomfield Patch.

Here’s wishing you L’shanah Tovah—the traditional Happy New Year greeting— and B'tayavon (that’s Hebrew for "Bon appétit")!

How are you celebrating Rosh Hashanah this year? Share your Rosh Hashanah recipes and traditions with us in the comments section below!

Dan September 17, 2012 at 05:01 PM
It is disconcerting to read such a bizarre mischaracterization of an important Jewish holiday. It is ignorant. Jews do not 'ring in' the New Year. It is not at all like the secular calendar's New Year Eve of December 31, a night associated with drinking, partying, debauchery, and resolutions soon to be broken. The shofar is not a party horn. Rosh Hashonah is not a festival. It is one of Judaism most sacred holiday, celebrated by family dinners and attendance at a special temple service. It marks the beginning of a period of contemplation (the Days of Awe) that ends on Yom Kippur.

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